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4 Crucial Considerations to Make Before You Hire a Fire Island, NY Inground Pool Company

For more than a decade, JAS Aquatics has been turning the backyards of Suffolk County into paradises. Our full-service, locally owned and operated Fire Island, NY inground pool installation company offers an array of services, including custom pool designs, 3D renderings, gunite pool and fiberglass pool installations, general pool care, steel vinyl liner replacements, and so much more! When you choose JAS Aquatics as your backyard swimming pool specialist, you can feel confident knowing that we’ll help you turn your yard into your very own private oasis.

4 Important Considerations to Make Before You Hire a Fire Island, NY Inground Pool Company

While a bathing suit, a towel, sandals, sunglasses, and a cover-up are all things that are okay to purchase on a whim, the pool that you’re going to use all of those items to swim in and hang out by definitely shouldn’t be an impulse buy. A backyard swimming pool is a major investment, so to ensure that you make the right decision, you’re going to want to do your homework before you contact a Suffolk County inground pool company.

Here’s a look at some crucial factors that you’re going to want to be clear on before you hire a Fire Island, NY inground pool installation specialist.

Your “Why”

Before you call an inground pool company, consider exactly why it is that you want to install a pool in your Suffolk County yard. Is it for exercise? To beat the summertime heat? For respite and relaxation? To host pool parties for family and friends? For your children to dive and splash in?

While any or all of the above-mentioned answers are good ones, you should definitely be clear about your reason(s) for wanting one, as your reason(s) for wanting a background swimming pool will dictate what type, style, and size will best suit your needs. You can then communicate your “why” to the Fire Island, NY inground pool installation company and they’ll help you decide on an option that will work best for you. For example, a lap pool would be a suitable choice for exercise, while a plunge pool would work for cooling off and relaxing, and if you intend on using it for playing and entertaining, a custom pool accented with water features would be ideal.

The Look and Feel

Once you’ve decided on the primary purpose for your Suffolk County backyard swimming pool, you should consider the look and feel you want to achieve. Maybe a custom pool, complete with a diving board and twisting slide is your idea of perfection. Perhaps a romantic pool with a beach entry and a grotto hidden behind a waterfall is your vision. For memorable pool parties, a spa that trickles over into the pool and that’s illuminated by color-changing lights would tickle your fancy. A reputable and experienced Suffolk County inground pool company will help you create the perfect design.

Your Price Range and Funding

Before you hire a Fire Island, NY inground pool installation company, you’re going to want to have a solid idea about your pool budget. You should also determine how you’re going to fund the purchase; for example, do you intend on paying in cash, with a credit card, or an unsecured line of credit? Ask your inground pool company what kind of financing options they offer, as a quality builder will have several options available.

Insurance Coverage

Before you contact a Suffolk County inground pool company, you should find out about insurance coverage. Get in touch with your homeowner’s insurance provider to find out how an inground pool installation will affect the rates on your existing policy. Since a swimming pool can be a safety hazard, you may need to meet certain requirements to minimize risks, such as installing safety fences with childproof locks and door alarms to reduce the risk of drowning.

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A Backyard Paradise is Just a Call or Click Away!

Ready to turn your Suffolk County backyard into an outdoor oasis? If so, get in touch with the premier Fire Island, NY inground pool installation specialist: JAS Aquatics! With more than a decade of experience and a proven track record of success, our full-service inground pool company offers a myriad of options and will work with you to create a pool design that will take your outdoor living space to the next level. For more details and to discuss the ideas you have in mind, call 516-385-7089 today!

Fire Island is the large center island of the outer barrier islands parallel to the south shore of Long Island, New York.

Though it is well established that indigenous Native Americans occupied what are today known as Long Island and Fire Island for many centuries before Europeans arrived, there has existed a long-standing myth that Long Island and nearby Fire Island were occupied by “thirteen tribes” “neatly divided into thirteen tribal units, beginning with the Canarsie who lived in present-day Brooklyn and ending with the Montauk on the far eastern end of the island.” Modern ethnographic research indicates, however, that before the European invasion, Long Island and Fire Island were occupied by “indigenous groups […] organized into village systems with varying levels of social complexity. They lived in small communities that were connected in an intricate web of kinship relations […] there were probably no native peoples living in tribal systems on Long Island until after the Europeans arrived. […] The communities appear to have been divided into two general culture areas that overlapped in the area known today as the Hempstead Plains […]. The western groups spoke the Delaware-Munsee dialect of Algonquian and shared cultural characteristics such as the longhouse system of social organization with their brethren in what is now New Jersey and Delaware. The linguistic affiliation of the eastern groups is less well understood […] Goddard […] concluded that the languages here are related to the southern New England Algonquian dialects, but he could only speculate on the nature of these relationships […]. Working with a few brief vocabulary lists of Montauk and Unquachog, he suggested that the Montauk might be related to Mohegan-Pequot and the Unquachog might possibly be grouped with the Quiripi of western Connecticut. The information on the Shinnecock was too sparse for any determination […] The most common pattern of indigenous life on Long Island prior to the intervention of the whites was the autonomous village linked by kinship to its neighbors.”

“Most of the ‘tribal’ names with which we are now familiar do not appear to have been recognized by either the first European observers or by the original inhabitants until the process of land purchases began after the first settlements were established. We simply do not know what these people called themselves, but all the ethnographic data on North American Indian cultures suggest that they identified themselves in terms of lineage and clan membership. […] The English and Dutch were frustrated by this lack of structure because it made land purchase so difficult. Deeds, according to the European concept of property, had to be signed by identifiable owners with authority to sell and have specific boundaries on a map. The relatively amorphous leadership structure of the Long Island communities, the imprecise delineation of hunting ground boundaries, and their view of the land as a living entity to be used rather than owned made conventional European real estate deals nearly impossible to negotiate. The surviving primary records suggest that the Dutch and English remedied this situation by pressing cooperative local sachems to establish a more structured political base in their communities and to define their communities as “tribes” with specific boundaries […] The Montauk, under the leadership of Wyandanch in the mid-seventeenth century, and the Matinnecock, under the sachems Suscaneman and Tackapousha, do appear to have developed rather tenuous coalitions as a result of their contact with the English settlers.”

“An early example of [European] intervention into Native American political institutions is a 1664 agreement wherein the East Hampton and Southampton officials appointed a sunk squaw named Quashawam to govern both the Shinnecock and the Montauk.”

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